I’ll be There Cheering for You Louder Than Anyone Who Might Be Booing

 cheering

What?! A profound quote from a silly Disney kids’ show? And from one of the more obnoxious characters as well. My kids watch the same episodes over and over and it took me about the fourth time before this quote grabbed a hold of me. “I’ll be there cheering for you louder than anyone who might be booing.”

Sure, our real-life circumstances might be a tad more serious than the one presented in the show, and ours won’t be resolved in 23 minutes before the credits roll.

I’ll be cheering loudly when the bullies at school tell you that you’re stupid or fat or ugly. I’ll be urging you to take the shot instead of passing the ball when you’re just too scared to try. I will be there to tell you it’s OK that you failed your math test and help you get prepared to do better on the next one.

I’ll help you keep your sense of humor when you lose your swimming trunks as you’re climbing out of the pool. I’ll tell those pointing, giggly little girls to hush and leave you be. And when you don’t get asked to prom, you’d better believe I’m going to tell you the truth: that they must be blind and, hey, it’s their loss. You go in there. You hold your head up high.

You keep in mind that the most beautiful, perfect, wise person there is created you, and HE doesn’t make mistakes.

And while we’re on the subject, HE really is perfect and he was rejected, too. No, He is rejected, too. Every single day.

Think about that!

I want you to know that people behave the way they do because of what’s inside them, not because of who YOU are. I know I say that all the time, but it bears repeating. They decide to look for and criticize your flaws (or they invent them) or they DECIDE to see what’s so amazing about you, and how they decide is based on what’s going on with THEM. If you want to survive intact, you have to respond with everything you’ve learned about you.

You’re respectfully and wonderfully made. You are the only you there has ever been or ever will be. You were made on purpose and placed into this particular time and space for a reason. God thought about you before he ever made the Earth and WANTED you to be. He made you to be loved and to spread love around.

Yeah, I’m here to cheer you on. But you know what’s going to happen if you don’t be careful? My voice is going to get drowned out by attacks on your character, your looks, your personality… How do I know that? Because even what God himself has to say is quickly supplanted by negative thoughts if I don’t fight it.

Why is that, I wonder? Why do the mean things have such a loud voice and all the true, lovely, kind things get pushed out? It happens to many of us.

Someone says you look nice today. Someone else makes fun of your clothes. You spend the whole rest of the day feeling bad. WHY!?!

Maybe, just maybe, you need to learn to cheer yourself on, too. Tell yourself what you’d tell a friend. ‘Cause, as much as I want to be there applauding, encouraging, soothing, helping you get back up when you fall, I can’t always be there.

Don’t waste time allowing miserable, lost, hateful people keep you down. Forgive. God will deal with them.  You pick yourself up, fix your eyes on your goal, ask God for help and healing, and GO.

Xavier and the Deadly Oatmeal

 killer oatmeal

Xavier, my almost 9 year old grandson(with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder): “I want oatmeal for breakfast.” Later: “What are those things in my oatmeal?”

“Peaches. Pick them out if you don’t like them. No complaints. No whining. No crying. We go through this every morning. And I want you to be aware that, because of the FASD, you have had a problem with textures. But you can overcome that. You just have to work a little harder at things sometimes. Also, grumbling and complaining is a sin. God doesn’t like it, so work on that, too.”

“But I hate those things! They just don’t taste good to me.”

“You used to LOVE that kind of oatmeal. You just hate the texture.”

“Well,” he continues with tears in his voice, “I have grown and my taste buds have changed.”

“Pick the peach parts out!” I say, exasperation raising my voice, “And suck it up! You are tougher than this! You can do this. You have to quit falling apart over everything.”  ugh. Suck it up?  Jeesh. Not my best moment.

“I guess I am a wimp.” Xavier is saying.

“NO! You are tough! And with God’s help, you can do anything. Anyhow, like I said, you used to love those things.”

“Well, now it tastes like I’m eating a rat.”

“We cannot afford to waste food! EAT THE OATMEAL! Get a fork and move all the peach parts to the side.”

“Ooooh,” (more whining), “I really wanted eggs.”

As I scrape the oatmeal into the trash later, I wonder whether to laugh or cry. Maybe a little bit of both.